A home design that weaves uninterrupted views of Utah’s iconic mountains into the daily living of the family that flocks there

Architects: Imbue Design
Location: Park City, United States
Year: 2016
Area: 4.500 ft²/ 418 m²
Photo courtesy:  Imbue Design
Description:

“On a gentle ridge looking out to Park City the Red Hawk residence is perched on a mountain crest that offers the perfect vantage point for its spectacular surroundings. By way of outdoor living spaces the home’s design weaves uninterrupted views of Utah’s iconic mountains into the daily living of the family that flocks there.

For Park City’s serene summer season the home is wrapped with a deck for breakfast dining, lazy day reading, and sunset viewing. But with the 7,500 foot elevation and the raw, breathtaking views also comes extreme weather in spectacular form. At this elevation the arrival of spring can bring with it gale force winds; early fall can produce earth trembling thunderstorms; and winter can pile up snow in excess of 12 feet [3.7m]. But this house is equipped for all seasons.

When the wind blows occupants can nest in the central courtyard garden for protection. When rain pours down the family can take refuge in a covered outdoor living room. And when snow falls and temperature drop large retractable doors close, converting the outdoor space into a cozy all-season room. Super insulated and built tighter than a beaver dam, this nest is always cozy and efficient.

Designed as a campus for work, living, and leisure the home is dynamic in its daily function. An outbuilding, separate from the living function, houses a workshop for all things loud and dirty. An office separated from the main house by the all-season room keeps work at work and leisure in living. And of course the guestroom has a wing of its own for privacy.

The owners are talented designers by nature and profession. You could say Imbue Design and the home owners are birds of a feather. After a delightful collaboration with these fun-loving people, they finally have a place to call their lifelong roost.”